PETA Offers Reward For Successful Lab-Grown Meat

According to the Daily Mail, animal welfare group PETA has offered a $1 million reward to the first scientist who can prove laboratory-grown chicken is viable by 2016. Proponents of lab-grown meat say it would be more environmentally friendly and reduce animal suffering.

To produce such meat, scientists obtain animal muscle cells and incubate them in a protein broth. The cells multiply and create a sticky tissue. The “wasted muscle” is “exercised” using lab equipment to achieve animal muscle ready to be sold, cooked and eaten. Some researchers claim that ten pork muscle cells could produce as many as 50,000 tons of meat in two months.

Photo by Flickr user soyculto


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Red Wine-Heart Researcher Charged With Fraud

A scientist responsible for studying the link between aging and resveratrol, found in red wine, has been accused of committing more than 100 acts of data fabrication and falsification, according to Reuters.

Dipak K. Das, who directed the University of Connecticut’s Cardiovascular Research Center, has been outed  by the university after it discovered the information. The university says it received an anonymous tip that led to an investigation beginning in 2008.

UConn was offered $890,000 in federal grants awarded to Das for his research, but declined to accept them in light of the new information. The university notified 11 scholarly journals – including Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, where Das was an editor-in-chief – that published the research.

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Cheese Not So Bad For Cholesterol, After All

New research released by Danish scientists, and sponsored by the Danish dairy industry, has found that cheese and butter affect LDL (bad) cholesterol levels differently. The study tested 50 people over several months, with some consuming butter and others cheese.

The research indicated that butter eaters experienced a 7 percent increase in their LDL cholesterol levels, while cheese eaters experienced no LDL change. Scientists say this may be due to the higher calcium in cheese, but more research needs to be done.

Photo by Flickr user WindwalkerNld, obtained from www.fotopedia.com


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Caffeinated Jerky: The Latest Military Technology

The Washington Post is reporting that military food scientists have developed their own version of caffeinated jerky, which contains about the same amount of caffeine as a cup of coffee. The technologists are also creating foods with supplements like omega 3s and curcumin, which fight inflammation. One of their latest concoctions is Zapplesauce, an applesauce laced with energy-boosting maltodextrin.


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Study Says FDA Seafood Safety Standards Dangerously Flawed

The Natural Resources Defense Council recently released a study that argues current FDA standards for seafood safety underestimate the risk to pregnant women and children of seafood affected by oil spills such as last year’s BP disaster. The report suggests that carcinogenic compounds may build up in the seafood as the result of such spills.

According to the group, the FDA’s error isn’t small. It contends that the agency’s standard for certain carbon compounds in seafood is off by as much as 10,000 times. The FDA’s seafood testing methods are viewed by the Council as outdated and overly assuming, and the group is asking the agency to set a rule limiting the amount of dangerous chemicals deemed safe for pregnant women and children.

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