The Average American Ate A Ton Last Year

According to NPR, the average American literally ate a ton of food last year, with most of the food consisting of cheese, sweets, potatoes and grains. The data, provided by the USDA, indicated that we each consume about 630 pounds of dairy per year and 185 pounds of meat and poultry. Americans consumed 273 pounds of fruit and 415 pounds of vegetables, but the majority of vegetables were starch-heavy corn and potatoes.

All that is topped off with 141 pounds of sweetener, including 42 pounds of corn syrup, and 85 pounds of fats. The USDA estimates the average American eats nearly 2,700 calories per day, which is significantly higher than the 2,000 recommended for an average person.

Photo by Flickr user rob_rob2001


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Is Your Favorite Seasonal Food On The Naughty List?

Huffington Post recently released it’s ‘Naughty & Nice’ list of this year’s seasonal restaurant items, which includes everything from a gingerbread martini to red velvet hot chocolate. While some of these concoctions look rather tasty, some should go straight to the top of the naughty list.


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Sour Candy Is Almost As Bad For Teeth As Battery Acid

A report by Northwest Dentistry says sucking on sour candy can be nearly as bad for your teeth as consuming battery acid. Teeth start losing enamel at pH 4, and many sour candies have a pH of 3 or less. Battery acid has a pH of 1.

Several candies have a pH very close to that, including WarHeads Sour Spray (pH 1.6), Wonka Fun Dip Powder (1.8) and Pixy Stix Powder (1.9). Even original Skittles and Brach’s Gummi Bears have a pH of 2.5.

Photo by Flickr user instantclassic


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Consumers Prefer Necco’s Artificial Ingredients

Natural food ingredients have become increasingly popular over the years, but when Necco Wafers began using natural flavors and colors in 2009, its customers quickly complained about the new product.

Customers were put off by the new colors of the candies, which were naturally derived from turmeric, red beets, purple cabbage and cocoa powder. While the flavors of the candy essentially remained the same, consumers claimed they tasted different, adding weight to the argument that the color of food affects its perceived taste.

Due to the overwhelmingly negative feedback, the company returned to artificial dyes in its products.

Photo by Flickr user Namlhots


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Candy Company Will Make A Gummy Of Your Face

Maynards Canada, a Kraft Canada brand, is holding a ‘Make Your Face a Maynards’ competition, where Facebook fans can upload a photo, trace their face from the picture and transform it into one of the company’s popular candies. Users then create their own customized package and submit a short explanation of why their face would be a great fit for Maynards. The winner will receive loads of prizes, including a year’s supply of candy featuring his or her face.